Prototype build – Pt 3

Delayed post (from early August 2016). I forgot to press ‘publish!’ I should stick to wood and leave computers alone I guess….

When I left you last I had just joined neck and body and started in on the hardware. Now the guitar is almost complete, it’s time to round off on the woodwork side of the job.

Because this is a total prototype, I strung the guitar up without worrying about a proper fret dress and finish – mainly because I wasn’t sure how I would react to the balance of it in the hand and I wanted to be sure that my design parameters had been correct.

The first thing I noticed was that despite the curvature of the body, the 22nd fret was still a bit of a reach – it was still to much a Les Paul type of feel. So I took a chisel to the body and the heel and blended them together. While it’s something I had considered before, it’s had never really been necessary with my other designs – especially the 24 fret Mk1 design, because I had such good access. But the problem here was the desire to get that almost ‘strat’ like weight distribution and balance which brought in the upper bout.

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It wasn’t long before I had a completely different feel above the 17th fret, and much closer to the feel I had envisaged for the design.

Now it was a case of smoothing the joint out and making the transition work properly.

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This is with the chisel alone. Then the convex scraper came into play, and a lot of sandpaper. The end result was much more pleasing. Sometimes you have to be prepared to almost ‘make a mess’ and be confident that you can make a smooth end to the job. When you’re this close to the end then it can feel that you’re taking your life in your hands a bit!

Here’s the finished joint before the fine sanding

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This felt totally different now, so I strung it up (sans electronics) and had a good play. The dimensions of the neck are on the large side – as this is a prototype I’ll probably end up keeping it as I have with many of the others.  So I have gone with the neck dimensions of my original guitar (a bit of a club really), wide at the nut (1 13/16th”) and an inch deep.

Somehow though, it just didn’t feel the same. The old girl has this real easy feel , despite it’s size, but this wasn’t quite right. So I cut into the shoulder of the neck shape again, removing more material without removing any real depth, That made a  lot of difference, but she still felt a bit of a handful, even though the dimensions were now technically smaller than the original from which it was derived. A quick look at the fretboard edges showed much of the problem – with the binding edge they were just a little too square. So I took the fret file to the edges and rounded the fretboard edges quite heavily. Again, it was making a massive difference. The guitar suddenly had a more natural feel.

The last step was to cut the the cavity covers from some of the left over Mahogany from the body. The pot cover is made by using the template for the router hole. The totally round switch cover is turned on the lathe using a body depth off cut, then sliced off with a mixture of a parting tool on the lathe and a handsaw. the final finish depth is made with a bench sander.

So here it is in it’s almost finished state

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And the front. Here’s how it looks with a little white spirit to clean out the dust from the grain.

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So now I’m sending this out to be spray finished. It’s something I have never done before, but I think it will pay dividends in the end. I have access to guys in the custom motorcycle trade who have been friends for years and have often helped me along the way when it comes to spraying guitars. They are also experts in dealing with vintage finishes like Nitro. In all honesty, my thing is the woodwork and although I can achieve a good finish on a guitar, these guys are top pros and will do a great job in half the time – and then I can move on to the next job knowing that the finishing process is in the best hands. It’s a massive de stress for me.

So, now to order the pickups….

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